Renewable Energy Tax

CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION EXPLAINED AND HOW THE 45Q TAX CREDIT CAN ALIGN WITH YOUR ESG GOALS

Carbon Capture, Utilization and Sequestration (CCUS) is the process of capturing carbon oxide (can be either carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide, but most commonly we speak of carbon dioxide or CO2) from emission sources for the purpose of preventing it from reaching the atmosphere, which would amplify greenhouse heating. Typically, the CO2 is permanently stored deep underground, but it can also be utilized in other ways, so long as the CO2 never reaches the atmosphere. CCUS and the related 45Q tax credit provides a unique opportunity for tax equity investors to invest in an Environmental, Societal, and Governance (ESG) friendly tax credit. The process of CCUS typically involves the following steps: Locate a predictable and constant source of carbon dioxide emissions: Most combustion processes create CO2, a few examples are coal/natural gas plants, power plants, and ethanol production. Capture the CO2: The process involved in capturing the CO2 depends on the concentration or purity levels of the source emissions. High purity emissions of CO2 (>95% by volume), such as the CO2 emitted from the biorefining of ethanol requires minimal, off-the-shelf-technology to separate out the CO2. Low purity emissions (<95% by volume), such as the CO2 emitted from a coal power plant require advanced technology and various chemical processes to separate out the CO2. Find storage site: A suitable storage site is required to permanently sequester the CO2. Currently, the most suitable sites may be a saline aquifer or in a depleted oil reservoir as is the case in enhanced oil recovery (EOR).  Other means of permanent storage are being pursued, for example permanent sequestration in concrete during the manufacturing process. Transfer the CO2 to the sequestration site: In some instances, producers (emitters) of CO2 may be conveniently located on or near a suitable storage site. In all other instances, pipelines are used to transport the CO2 from the emitters to the…

Read More
sustainability

Solar Industry Veteren Alex Tiller To Launch Renewable Energy Tax Equity Fund

Solar Industry Veteran Alex Tiller to Launch Renewable Energy Tax Equity Fund September 1, 2017, San Francisco, California – Foss & Company is pleased to announce that Solar industry veteran Alex Tiller has joined the firm as Managing Director to launch a new tax equity investment fund and syndication platform focused on renewable energy projects throughout the US. The new group will be based in Denver Colorado and seeks to deploy $300 Million in renewable energy projects by the end of 2018.  Foss Renewable Energy Partners primary focus is on photovoltaic solar and storage projects but may make discretionary investments in other renewable energy technologies. When asked about the new fund Mr. Tiller said, “due to the nuance and complexity of the tax code, the tax credit market is extremely inefficient for investors and energy project developers alike. Our goal is to streamline and simplify the process on both sides, allowing more capital to flow to high quality projects faster.” Mr. Tiller is the former President of Vancouver BC based Solar Alliance Energy, Inc. and the former CEO of Sunetric, previously Hawaii’s largest solar company.  Tiller was also a founding partner of Sunetric Capital, Aloha Solar Energy, and Aloha Solar Partners.  All three entities operated within the solar project development, financing, and asset management space.  Prior to his career in renewables, Tiller led the development of a private equity investment fund focused on agriculture and he started his career at Fidelity Investments. Foss & Company is a national institutional investment management firm founded in 1983.  The company has deployed over $5 Billion in cash equity from institutional investors including national insurance companies and large corporations.  Foss provides its investors with a broad array of tax credit programs combined with the most efficient implementation available in the tax credit marketplace. To date the…

Read More